The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Continuing Education presents the Wisconsin Hand Experience | May 9-11, 2024 | Milwaukee, WI and Live Online

Wisconsin Hand Experience℠ 2024

Unraveling
the Mysteries
of the Wrist

May 9-11, 2024 | Milwaukee, WI and Live Online
Register before March 9 for priority workshop placement.

Join us May 9-11, 2024

LIVE: In-person or Online

Enhance your therapeutic skills and earn up to 1.7 CEUs (17 Contact Hours) when you attend all three days of the conference. On Thursday and Friday, enjoy a compelling line-up of lectures from an array of respected therapists. On Saturday, in-person attendees can choose from four face-to-face workshops while online attendees have the option of attending the “Manual Therapy Techniques for Wrist Stiffness” workshop. Early registrations receive priority workshop placement. Use the event platform to ask panel questions, network with each other, and interact with exhibitors.

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Overarching Conference Learning Outcomes:

  • Recall the primary osteo-ligamentous organization of the wrist.
  • List factors determining the functional range of motion at the wrist.
  • Recognize key anatomic structures at the humeroulnar joint and proximal radioulnar joint.
  • Identify differentiating features of tenosynovitis and tendinopathy.
  • Describe common fracture patterns and treatments for distal radius fractures.
  • Explain the significance of the volar ulnar corner in distal radius fractures.
  • Define Neuromodulation Coaching and its role in UE rehabilitation.
  • Identify the anatomy and arthrokinematics of the radiocarpal joint and midcarpal joint.
  • Explain how the structure of wrist joints influences overall kinematics.
  • Describe the dart thrower’s motion and its muscular biomechanics.
  • Discuss differential etiologies of ulnar-sided wrist pain.
  • Analyze outcomes studies influencing decision-making in wrist rehabilitation.
  • Understand the roles of hand therapy in distal radius fractures.
  • Explain the triangles model and its application in UE rehabilitation.
  • Evaluate upper extremity movement system, identifying imbalances related to desk work.
  • Discuss emerging trends in SL rehabilitation.
  • Apply joint mobilization techniques for the wrist and thumb CMC joint.
  • Utilize evidence-based approaches to treat neuromuscular dysfunction.
  • Apply various rehabilitation principles for different operative interventions.
  • Implement treatment approaches based on patient archetypes for wrist pain.
  • Apply clinical examinations and treatments for upper quadrant limitations.
  • Apply neuromuscular re-education and home program strategies for upper quadrant and thoracic mobility.
  • Analyze results of Triangle Model Assessments and apply them to wrist pain treatment.
  • Analyze surgical options based on patient activity and clinical findings.
  • Evaluate the benefits and risks of different surgical approaches for wrist injuries.
  • Analyze joint mobilization techniques to determine their effectiveness in improving wrist mobility.
  • Analyze upper quadrant compression cases and identify appropriate treatment strategies.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of different orthotic techniques and strategies.
  • Evaluate the success of post-op protocols for various operative interventions.
  • Evaluate the impact of home exercise programs on addressing imbalances related to desk work.
  • Evaluate the progress of patients undergoing neuromuscular re-education.
  • Create and implement personalized treatment plans based on patient archetypes.
  • Create home exercise programs addressing specific UE imbalances.
  • Create soft goods devices using sewing machines and alter orthotic devices.
  • Create innovative orthotic techniques and materials for specific wrist conditions.

Level of Instruction:
Intermediate

Target Audience:
OTs, OTAs, PTs, PTAs, ATs, and Hand Therapists

Relevance to Occupational Therapy:
Category 1: Occupational Therapy Service Delivery

Contact Us

Email: sce-hps@uwm.edu

Phone: (414) 251-8950

Presenters

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Emily Altman, PT, DPT, CHT, OCS, CLT-LANA, WCC

Emily Altman, PT, DPT, CHT, OCS, WCC, has been a full-time clinician at Hospital for Special Surgery’s Hand Therapy Center for 27 years. Her passion for the art and challenge of evaluating and treating patients has kept her in the clinic 100% of the time. She enjoys traveling all over the country attending continuing education programs and learning new things. Special interests include custom orthotic fabrication, wound care, lymphedema, office ergonomics and manual therapy. Emily has lectured nationally and internationally. She is on the faculty of HSS’s hand therapy fellowship program.

Curtis Crimmins, MD

Curtis Crimmins, MD is a board-certified plastic and reconstructive surgeon with over 25 years of experience practicing in the Milwaukee area with Hand to Shoulder Specialists of Wisconsin. Dr Crimmins completed his medical degree at Wayne State University School of Medicine. He also completed residency in plastic and reconstructive surgery at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center as well as Harvard Medical School, and his fellowship in hand and microsurgery at the University of California. Dr Crimmins is the hand surgery consultant for the Milwaukee Bucks, Milwaukee Admirals, and the Milwaukee Wave. He is an active member of the American Society of Surgery of the Hand as well as American Association for Hand Surgery.

Alexander Graf, MD

Dr. Graf is a Hand and Upper Extremity Surgeon at Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin. He attended the University of Wisconsin and earned a BS in Neurobiology. He attended the Medical College of Wisconsin for medical school and Orthopedic Surgery residency. He is an alumnus of the prestigious Emory Hand and Upper Extremity Fellowship in Atlanta, Georgia. He lives in Cedarburg, WI with his wife and three young children.

Nicole Hoover, OTR, CHT

Nikki Hoover, MS, OTR/L, CHT graduated from UW-Milwaukee in 2011 and began teaching for the school of continuing education shortly thereafter. She started OT school wanting to become a hand therapist and her passion has only grown stronger. She shares that passion as an instructor for multiple courses in the OT program at UW-Milwaukee, including biomechanics, fieldwork reflections, and hand therapy. She maintains an active role in the American Society of Hand Therapists and recently facilitated a donation of $15,000 for a scholarship fund and another $15,000 for research through American Hand Therapy Foundation to memorialize the closing of Wisconsin Hand Therapy Association. She is now pursuing a PhD at UW-Milwaukee with a goal of becoming a researcher in a teaching hospital.

Jemerie Hopkins, MS, OTR, CHT

Jemerie Hopkins, MS, OTR, CHT received her master’s degree in occupational therapy from the University of Minnesota in 2002. She has been practicing exclusively in hand therapy for 20 years. During this time, she has worked closely with both orthopedic and plastic surgeons in various locations including Northwestern Hospital in Chicago IL for 10 years and currently at Froedtert Hospital in orthopedic rehabilitation/hand therapy. She is on the board of ASHT – serving in its practice management division as well as a mentor for new hand therapists.

Steven Kempton, MD

Steven Kempton, MD is a plastic surgery trained hand surgeon employed with SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital Madison with an adjunct clinical professorship at University of Wisconsin Madison. He attended medical school at Loma Linda, CA and completed his plastic surgery training at the University of Wisconsin Madison. His subspeciality training in hand and microsurgery was completed at the University of California Los Angeles. He is board certified in plastic surgery with additional certification in surgery of the hand.

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Lisa Kozden, PhD, OTR, CHT, COMT

Lisa Kozden, Ph.D., OTR, CHT, COMT is an occupational therapist with 23 years of experience in treating patients with hand and upper extremity conditions. She graduated with a master’s degree in occupational therapy (MOT) in 2000 from Nova Southeastern University, became certified as a hand therapist (CHT) in 2008, and achieved certification as an orthopedic manual therapist (COMT) in 2014 by the International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine US (IAOM-US). Over the last 8 years, Lisa has been teaching full-time as a Faculty Specialist in the Occupational Therapy Department at The University of Scranton. On a part-time basis, she treats patients for a regional healthcare system in Northeastern PA and teaches continuing education courses in the Upper Extremity Track for IAOM. Lisa serves as a member of the Research Division for the American Society for Hand Therapists (ASHT) and has recently earned her PhD in Occupational Therapy from Nova Southeastern University. Her topic of research involves the infusion of a psychoneuroimmunology (PNI)-based program into upper extremity rehabilitation.

Donald A. Neumann, PhD, PT, FAPTA

Donald A. Neumann, PhD, PT, FAPTA received a B.S. in physical therapy from the University of Florida. After several years of practice and teaching in rehabilitation of persons with spinal cord injury, he went on to receive a Ph.D in Exercise Science from the University of Iowa. In 1986, he joined Marquette University where he is currently Professor Emeritus in the Department of Physical Therapy. His areas of teaching include kinesiology and anatomy. Dr. Nuemann has received several of the highest awards offered by the American Physical Therapy Association for his teaching, writing, research, and international service. Dr. Neumann received a Teacher of the Year Award at Marquette University and was named Wisconsin’s College Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation. Dr. Neumann has received Fulbright Scholarships to teach kinesiology in Lithuania, Hungary, Japan, and Ireland. In 2007, he received an Honorary Doctorate Degree from Lithuanian University of Health Sciences for his impact on the growth of physiotherapy education across Lithuania. Dr. Neumann is the author of Human Kinesiology: Foundations for Rehabilitation, published by Elsevier, 3rd ed, 2017 (4th edition expected in 2024). He has also authored chapters on the HIP in the 41st and 42nd editions of British Gray’s Anatomy. He was an Associate Editor of JOSPT from 2002-2015.

Ann Porretto-Loehrke, PT, DPT, CHT, COMT, CMTPT

Ann Porretto-Loehrke is a skilled clinician with a passion for teaching and clinical treatment of upper extremity disorders. She has been practicing for 30 years and teaching continuing education courses for the past 20. She serves as the Clinical Development Coordinator at the Hand to Shoulder Center in Appleton, Wisconsin. Ann is a Certified Hand Therapist (CHT) and a Certified Orthopedic Manual Therapist (COMT) for treatment of the upper quadrant through the International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine (IAOM). Ann received a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from Marquette University in 1994 and completed a post-professional Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) degree from Drexel University with a specialty in hand and upper quarter rehabilitation in 2007. She is also certified in dry needling through Myopain Seminars, as a Certified Myofascial Trigger Point Therapist (CMTPT). Ann is a lead instructor who co-developed the Hand & Upper Extremity Track through IAOM, a set of 6 manual therapy courses designed specifically for hand and upper extremity specialists. She co-authored a chapter in Rehabilitation of the Hand & Upper Extremity on nerve compression syndromes of the elbow and forearm, as well as published two peer-reviewed articles entitled “Clinical Manual Assessment of the Wrist” and “Taping Techniques for the Wrist” in the 2016 Journal of Hand Therapy’s special edition of the wrist. Ann has presented at American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT) annual meetings, Canadian Society of Hand Therapist Annual Conferences, Philadelphia meetings, TRIA Hand Conference, and Teton Hand Conferences. She also teaches online courses for MedBridge education and fostered the development of MedBridge’s CHT prep program.

Ashley Pulvermacher, OTR, ATC

Ashley Pulvermacher is a highly skilled clinician who utilizes her background in athletic training and sports medicine to complement occupational therapy interventions to optimize patient outcomes. Ashley graduated from Concordia University with a BS in Athletic Training in 2011. In 2013, she completed a Master of Science in Sports Medicine from the University of Colorado. Ashley interned at the Olympic Training Center as part of her master’s program and continued working with USA Volleyball for several years. During her career in sports medicine, she worked with athletes ranging from novice to professional. Ashley developed a full-time sports medicine program for the Fountain Valley School of Colorado that included coverage of 18 athletic programs, concussion management protocols, and injury prevention. In 2019, Ashley completed her second master’s degree, earning a Master of Science in Occupational Therapy from Concordia University. She has worked in a variety of clinical settings in both Colorado and Wisconsin. She is a hand and upper extremity therapist at the Hand to Shoulder Center in Appleton, Wisconsin. While focusing her attention on upper quadrant injuries, Ashley specializes in the analysis of kinetic chain movement to maximize functional outcomes and enjoys sharing these skills with others.

Cassandra Schuh, OTR, CHT, COMT, CMTPT

Cassandra (Cassie) Schuh is a 2010 graduate from Mount Mary College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin with a Master of Science Degree in Occupational Therapy. Cassie started her career at Aurora Medical Center Manitowoc County- Two Rivers until 2014 when she joined the Hand to Shoulder Center. Cassie holds certifications in Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE), Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT – Big Version), and a Certification in Orthopedic Manual Therapy (COMT) from the International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine (IAOM). Cassie is published in the 2016 Special Interest Journal of Hand Therapy with Ann Porretto-Loehrke, Clinical Manual Assessment of the Wrist. She obtained her Certified Hand Therapy Certification in 2016 and Certified Manual Trigger Point Therapist in 2022. She served as Treasurer of the Wisconsin Hand Therapy Association (WISHTA) from 2017-2020. Cassie has presented at Symposiums through Hand to Shoulder Center on Functional Capacity Evaluations in 2016 and pain management in 2018. She has also assisted guest speakers at the Wisconsin Hand Experience in 2017, 2019 and 2022.

Greg Watchmaker, MD

Greg Watchmaker, MD attended Washington University School of Medicine and continued his education at Barnes/Jewish/Children’s Hospital in St. Louis as a resident in general/plastic surgery. He completed his training in Pittsburgh in the department of orthopaedics as a hand and upper extremity fellow. For 15 years, he was an invited instructor in the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) cadaveric lab where he taught hand and upper extremity anatomy to medical students and more recently has been an invited grand rounds lecturer at MCW on the topic of nerve compression. His prospective study on surgical outcomes following median nerve decompression received the award for the most meaningful published research in the field of hand surgery in 2020 by the journal Hand.

Wisconsin Hand Experience℠ 2024

May 9-11, 2024

In-Person in Milwaukee

Crowne Plaza Milwaukee South 6401 South 13th Street, Milwaukee, WI 53221. $109 Single/Double Room Rates. Make reservations online or by calling 866-663-4577 by April 9, 2024. For the room rate you must identify yourself as a member of “University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee” and reference Block Code “U24 (uniform-two-four).”

May 9-11

Watch LIVE In-Person or Online

17 Contact Hours

For all Three Days 1.7 CEUs

20% OFF Groups of 3 or More

Receive 20% OFF three or more Registrations.  Email sceinfo@uwm.edu for more details & see FAQs below.

In-Person Workshops

  • When it’s Not Carpal Tunnel: Addressing Proximal Issues
  • Manual Therapy Techniques for Wrist Stiffness
  • Tips and Tricks for Orthotic Fabrication
  • How Neuromodulation Affects Occupational Performance

Live Online Workshop

The “Manual Therapy Techniques for Wrist Stiffness” workshop will be live-streamed.

Live Stream from Anywhere

Using our Event Platform

Online Exhibitors & Networking for All Attendees

Networking for In-Person & Online Attendees using our Event Platform.

Watch Live Online

Livestream Sessions using the Event Platform

  • Watch from a Computer Web Browser or Mobile Device App with Internet Connection
  • View Content LIVE at Full Screen
  • Participate in Panel Discussion Questions
  • Network with All Attendees & Exhibitors
  • Download & View Handouts
  • Participate in a Giveaway to WIN Free Wisconsin Hand Experience℠ Registration for 2025!
  • View Agenda, PPT Slides, Workshop & Session Details & Speaker Bios
Laptop showing conference

Thursday, May 9, 12:00pm-5:00pm CT (4 hours 30 minutes) (.45 CEUs)

One Page Agenda PDF

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11:00AM

In-Person Registration Check-In & Exhibits Open
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12:00PM

Welcome & Introduction

Ann Porretto-Loehrke, PT, DPT, CHT, COMT, CMTPT, Hand to Shoulder Center of Wisconsin, Appleton, WI

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12:15PM

Anatomy and Kinesiology of the Wrist: Reviewing the Essentials

Donald A. Neumann, PhD, PT, FAPTA, Professor Emeritus Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI

An overview of the primary osteo-ligamentous organization of the wrist will be presented. A discussion will follow on the morphology of the proximal and distal rows of carpal bones, with special attention to the differences between the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The unique contribution that each joint has on overall wrist kinematics will be reviewed, with a spotlight on the functional ROM at the wrist and the unique kinematics of the dart thrower’s motion. The muscular drive across the wrist will be analyzed, with an emphasis on understanding the primary synergies and how kinetic balance is normally achieved at the wrist. Finally, a summary of how the position and stability of the wrist influences active and passive forces within the extrinsic digital flexors will be presented.
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1:00pm

Surgical Management for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome

Alexander Graf, MD, Froedtert & Medical College of Wisconsin, Wauwatosa, WI

This presentation will describe the anatomy of the ulnar wrist, introduce the diagnostic approach to distinguishing different etiologies of ulnar-sided wrist pain, and then review the various surgical options for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome.
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1:45PM

Break
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2:15PM

Forearm Rotation Limitations Following Trauma

Injuries to the elbow can often result in significant stiffness, limiting a person’s ability to perform daily activities. Stiffness in the elbow capsule due to trauma or immobilization can create limitations with both elbow flexion and extension as well as forearm rotation. Join us to learn more about manual techniques you can readily apply in the clinic to maximize motion at the elbow and forearm to optimize your patient’s occupational performance!
}

3:00PM

Clinical Manual Assessment of the Wrist

Ann Porretto-Loehrke, PT, DPT, CHT, COMT, CMTPT, Hand to Shoulder Center of Wisconsin, Appleton, WI

What is the most challenging type of hand therapy diagnosis to evaluate? Is it a patient with a crush injury involving multiple fractures and tendon repairs or….is it the young girl with progressive onset of wrist pain? Hand therapists are typically well-versed in the “rhythm” of evaluating post-operative patients; however, performing a wrist evaluation for a conservative patient presenting with wrist pain can sometimes be daunting. Using a systematic approach combining findings from the patient’s history, clinical examination, and special tests, hand therapists can more efficiently determine the underlying pathology and provide appropriate treatment to optimize clinical outcomes.
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4:30PM

Panel Discussion

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5:00PM

Adjourn
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6:00PM

Exhibits Close

Thursday Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the primary osteo-ligamentous organization of the wrist.
  • Cite factors that help determine the functional range of motion available at the wrist.
  • Explain how the structure of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints contributes to the overall kinematics of the wrist.
  • Report the unique kinematic path, muscle interactions, and functional “benefits” of the dart thrower’s motion.
  • Provide examples of how the muscular biomechanics of the wrist influence the function of the hand.
  • Explain the differential etiologies of ulnar-sided wrist pain.
  • Identify diagnostic maneuvers and tests helpful for making the correct diagnosis.
  • Describe surgical treatment options for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome and their associated benefits and complications.
  • Identify key anatomic structures at the humeroulnar joint (HUJ) and proximal radioulnar joint (PRUJ) to determine the direction of traction and/or glide prior to initiating joint mobilization.
  • Describe traction techniques for the HUJ to maximize elbow flexion as needed to improve engagement in ADLs such as eating and UB dressing.
  • Describe traction techniques for the HUJ to maximize elbow extension using medial and lateral gliding to promote increased engagement in LB dressing and home management tasks.
  • Explain joint mobilization techniques for the PRUJ to improve forearm pronation and supination.
  • Issue home programs which help patients maximize forearm rotation including neuromuscular re-education at the PRUJ.
  • Describe the capsular pattern of the wrist and what it means regarding progression of the plan of care.
  • Perform a physical examination to determine tenosynovitis from tendinopathy.
  • Practice clinical testing to evaluate stability of the scapholunate interval, lunotriquetral interval, midcarpal joint, and distal radioulnar joints.

Friday, May 10, 8:00am-5:30pm CT (7 hours 30 Minutes) (.75 CEUs)

One Page Agenda PDF

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7:00AM

In-Person Registration Opens
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7:40AM

Exhibits Open
}

8:00AM

Welcome & Introduction

Ann Porretto-Loehrke, PT, DPT, CHT, COMT, CMTPT, Hand to Shoulder Center of Wisconsin, Appleton, WI

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8:15AM

Distal Radius Fracture: When to Operate, When to Cast?

Greg Watchmaker, MD, The Milwaukee Hand Center, Milwaukee, WI

Description: Clinical and radiographic outcomes of distal radius fractures do not tightly correlate. Many factors can influence decision-making regarding surgery vs. closed management. The role of the hand therapist can differ between these two groups with regard to timing of therapy, specific modalities and exercises, and patient expectation setting regarding visible deformity. This lecture explores the science behind a common fracture with significant treatment variability.
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9:00AM

Cadaveric Dissection – Distal Radius Fracture

Greg Watchmaker, MD, The Milwaukee Hand Center, Milwaukee, WI

A cadaveric dissection of the distal forearm and wrist highlighting anatomy pertinent to patients suffering distal radius fractures.
}

9:45AM

Distal Radii Chronicles

Emily Altman, PT, DPT, CHT, OCS, CLT-LANA, WCC, Hospital for Special Surgery’s Hand Therapy Center, New York, NY

Distal radius fractures seem to have a bad reputation in the clinic, such as not very interesting, a dime-a-dozen, etc. This could not be farther from the truth! Fractures of the distal radius are fascinating. Fracture patterns are innumerable and often mechanically complex. Fixation methods are numerous and technically intriguing. Studying distal radius fractures, evaluating surgeon fixation choices, and predicting hand therapy challenges is like solving a puzzle. This presentation will be heavily image-based. Numerous x-rays and CT scans will be presented and discussed. This presentation is the culmination of many months of collecting examples of images and discussions with attending hand surgeons. It is a body of work that is fluid and constantly growing as cases come through the presenter’s clinic.
}

10:30AM

Break
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11:00AM

Neuromuscular Re-education Principles

Nikki Hoover, MS, OTR/L, CHT, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and The University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI

Movement is a complex human function that relies on sensory feedback, motor control and strength. Many movements used in daily activities are habitual and automatic, requiring very little thought, but when dysfunction occurs, previously simple movement patterns become challenging. Neuromuscular re-education is an important therapeutic technique addressing motor skills to facilitate return to full function after a disruption.
}

11:45AM

How Neuromodulation Coaching Affects Occupational Performance

Lisa Kozden, PhD, OTR, CHT, COMT, University of Scranton and Hands For Life Therapy, LLC, Plains, PA

Treating patients with wrist pain can be challenging based on everyone’s occupational history and performance needs. Neuromodulation coaching is a unique treatment approach which helps to assess and categorize each patient into specific archetypes with associated neurophysiological profiles. By understanding each patient’s archetype, a clinician can create and implement more effective plans of care which address the physical, mental, and emotional health of the patient. Join us to learn more about Neuromodulation coaching and how it can help improve the occupational performance of patients with wrist pain.
}

12:30PM

Lunch
}

1:30PM

Surgical Management of Scapholunate Injury

Steven Kempton, MD, SSM Health Saint Mary’s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI

This presentation will provide an in-depth look at the scapholunate ligament, ruptures, and the associated carpal instability as well as current surgical management of these injuries.
}

2:15PM

Salvage Procedures for Scaphoid Lunate Advanced Collapse (SLAC)/Scaphoid Nonunion Advanced Collapse (SNAC) Wrists

Curtis Crimmins, MD, Hand to Shoulder Specialists of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI

This presentation will provide an overview of anatomy of the carpus along with a review of predisposing causative factors for conditions of both a scaphoid lunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) including scapho-lunate instability, scaphoid fractures, radius fractures, and idiopathic onset. Surgical treatment options and when to choose them will be presented including radial styloidectomy, full scaphoidectomy, 4 corner fusion, proximal row carpectomy, capitate resurfacing, total wrist, and wrist fusion.
}

3:00PM

Break
}

3:30PM

Rehab Principles Following Scapholunate Injury

Jemerie Hopkins, MS, OTR, CHT, Froedtert & Medical College of Wisconsin, Wauwatosa, WI

The presentation will provide a brief overview of scapholunate ligament injuries (SLLI) and a comprehensive summary of the rehabilitation process. Emphasis on the importance of evidenced- based approaches in SLLI recovery, and encouragement for health care providers to stay updated on the latest therapeutic treatments and techniques for optimal outcomes will be presented.
}

4:15PM

Beyond Mice and Keyboards

Emily Altman, PT, DPT, CHT, OCS, CLT-LANA, WCC, Hospital for Special Surgery’s Hand Therapy Center, New York, NY

A lot of time, effort, and study has gone into perfecting the physics of a work station. Categories of faults have been identified (trunk flexion, neck extension, point loading, shoulder elevation, etc.). The marketplace is well stocked with “ergonomic devices.” Handouts have been perfected with comprehensive bullet point lists and artists’ renderings of perfect posture at a desk. There is a missing piece, the person sitting at the desk is an office athlete. Solving their musculoskeletal aches and pains with equipment and patient education alone may not be enough. The office athlete deserves a careful, focused evaluation of their upper extremity movement system including the length, strength, and performance of the muscles of the upper quarter. Clients deserve a targeted home exercise program to address imbalances and prepare for the very real physical challenges of a desk job. Drawing heavily on the work of Shirley Sahrmann, PT, PhD, FAPTA, this presentation will apply a movement system impairment (MSI) syndromes approach to the evaluation and treatment of an office athlete.
}

5:00PM

Panel Discussion

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5:30PM

Adjourn
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6:30PM

Exhibits Close

Friday Learning Outcomes

  • Describe common fracture patterns and both surgical and non-operative treatments.
  • Describe outcome studies that influence decision-making.
  • Identify the differing roles of hand therapy for distal radius fracture.
  • Identify the planes of dissection and tissue affected in patients suffering a distal radius fracture and surgical intervention.
  • Describe soft-tissue structures potentially at risk when treating patients conservatively as well as surgically.
  • Describe the significance of the volar ulnar corner in distal radius fractures.
  • Explain what “locking plate” means and why it revolutionized the management of distal radius fractures.
  • Describe the role of ligamentous attachments in the fracture pattern of distal radius fractures.
  • Identify why some distal radius fractures require a dorsal approach.
  • Recognize when neuromuscular control is an issue.
  • Demonstrate competence in using outcome measures for neuromuscular control.
  • Utilize evidence-based approaches to treat neuromuscular dysfunction.
  • Describe scapholunate injury (SL) ligament anatomy and response to injury.
  • Identify diagnosis and treatment options related to repair.
  • Explain how to achieve pain free function.
  • Define neuromodulation coaching within the context of UE rehabilitation.
  • Explain The triangles model and characteristics of each archetype.
  • Analyze results of a triangle model assessment (TMA-o) and identify how it applies to treatment of a patient with wrist pain.
  • Create and implement treatment approaches based on a patient’s archetype to improve occupational performance.
  • Describe the etiology of both the SNAC and SLAC wrist.
  • Identify surgical options based on patient activity/expectations and clinical/radiographic findings.
  • Explain surgical approaches related to the SNAC and SLAC wrist including radial styloidectomy, full scaphoidectomy, 4-corner fusion, proximal row carpectomy, capitate resurfacing, total wrist, and wrist fusion.
  • Describe both the benefits and risks of the various surgical approaches.
  • Describe conservative management for scapholunate ligament injuries including types of orthoses, pain management, range of motion and strengthening exercises.
  • Explain post op protocols for different operative interventions (e.g., ligament repair, ligament reconstruction) and the early post op treatments involved for each.
  • Apply a variety of rehabilitation principles for treatment later in the process such as proprioceptive and neuromuscular training as well as return to work or return to sport progressive treatments.
  • Explain emerging trends in treatment of SL rehabilitation.
  • Describe an evaluation for the upper extremity movement system including the length, strength, and performance of the muscles of the upper quarter.
  • Explain a home exercise program to address imbalances related to sitting at a desk.
  • Apply a movement system impairment approach to the evaluation and treatment of office work.

Saturday Workshops

May 11, 8:00am-1:30pm CT
(5 hours) (.5 CEUs)

 

Choose One Workshop Session:

Tips and Tricks for Orthotic Fabrication (In-person)

Emily Altman, PT, DPT, CHT, OCS, CLT-LANA, WCC, Hospital for Special Surgery’s Hand Therapy Center, New York, NY

Read More

May 11, 8:00am-1:30pm CT
(5 hours) (.5 CEUs)

This workshop will be an engaging, interactive, hands-on session in which carefully chosen favorites from a career’s worth of orthotic fabrication and design strategies will be presented. A variety of design and fabrication pearls will be described and demonstrated. Videos may be used to supplement written materials. The workshop will include the use of low temperature thermoplastics, spandex material, Fabrifoam material, neoprene, Delta Cast Conformable, and more. The use of a sewing machine to upgrade your skill set will be available. If you are not familiar with sewing machine use, there will be an intro to sewing machine use session Friday, May 10 following the conference presentations.

 

At the end of the presentation, participants will:

  • Identify two to three new orthotic techniques and strategies to use immediately.
  • Use a sewing machine to fabricate a simple soft goods device and alter a Comfort Cool Thumb CMC Restriction Splint.
  • Describe two to three new tools or materials for orthotic fabrication.

 

How Neuromodulation Coaching Affects Occupational Performance (In-person)

Lisa Kozden, Ph.D., OTR, CHT, COMT, University of Scranton and Hands For Life Therapy, LLC, Plains, PA

Read More

May 11, 8:00am-1:30pm CT
(5 hours) (.5 CEUs)

Treating patients with wrist pain can be challenging based on everyone’s occupational history and performance needs. Neuromodulation coaching is a unique treatment approach which helps to assess and categorize each patient into specific archetypes with associated neurophysiological profiles. By understanding each patient’s archetype, a clinician can create and implement more effective plans of care which address the physical, mental, and emotional health of the patient. Join us to learn more about Neuromodulation coaching and how it can help improve the occupational performance of patients with wrist pain.

 

At the end of the presentation, participants will:

  • Define Neuromodulation Coaching within the context of UE rehabilitation.
  • Explain The Triangles Model and characteristics of each archetype.
  • Analyze results of a Triangle Model Assessment (TMA-o) and identify how it applies to treatment of a patient with wrist pain.
  • Create and implement treatment approaches based on a patient’s archetype to improve occupational performance.

Manual Therapy Techniques for Wrist Stiffness (In-person or Live Online)

Ann Porretto-Loehrke, PT, DPT, CHT, COMT, CMTPT, Hand to Shoulder Center of Wisconsin, Appleton, WI

Read More

May 11, 8:00am-1:30pm CT
(5 hours) (.5 CEUs)

Discover new manual therapy techniques to facilitate improved mobility at the wrist using a systematic approach. The workshop combines lecture and lab to give hand therapists manual therapy techniques to improve motion at the wrist and thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint that can be used immediately in the clinic. This course is beneficial for both the new graduate and seasoned clinician alike.

 

At the end of the presentation, participants will:

  • Explain the anatomy of the wrist, including the arthrokinematics of radiocarpal joint (RCJ) and midcarpal joint (MCJ) motion.
  • Draw out pertinent surface anatomy to identify landmarks for performing manual techniques.
  • Perform testing to identify a capsular pattern of the wrist and thumb carpometacarpal (CMC), to determine if joint mobilization is indicated.
  • Demonstrate how to perform joint mobilization techniques to address limitations at the wrist and thumb CMC joint to facilitate improved mobility.
  • Recognize how the radial column of the wrist contributes to motion at the thumb CMC joint.

When it’s Not Carpal Tunnel: Addressing Proximal Issues (In-person)

Ashley Pulvermacher, OTR, ATC and Cassandra Schuh, OTR, CHT, COMT, CMTPT, Hand to Shoulder Center of Wisconsin, Appleton, WI

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May 11, 8:00am-1:30pm CT
(5 hours) (.5 CEUs)

This workshop will discuss a manual therapy approach to gain skills and provide treatment for patients with distal symptomatology related to proximal compression. It will emphasize proximal assessment and treatment of rib hypomobility, capsular stiffness, scapular dyskinesis, and fascial limitations of the trunk. Additionally, therapists will learn neuromuscular re-education techniques to improve thoracic spine mobility, scapular positioning, GHJ movement patterns, and a home program to teach patients.

 

At the end of the presentation, participants will:

  • Describe three main passageways that can be involved with upper quadrant compression: scalene triangle, costoclavicular space, and the subpectoral space.
  • Discuss cervical and thoracic spine segmental mobility.
  • Identify common soft tissue culprits related to upper quadrant limitations.
  • Perform clinical examinations including Roos test (Elevated Arm Stress Test), Cyriax release test, thoracic segmental mobility, active and passive neurodynamic movement.
  • Demonstrate ability to test and treat 1st rib limitations associated with upper quadrant limitations.
  • Assess scapular alignment to identify postural influences in upper quadrant compression.
  • Perform assessment and treatment of posterior glenohumeral capsule limitations.
  • Apply neuromuscular re-education and home program strategies to maximum upper quadrant and thoracic mobility.

Pricing & CEUs

Prices are the same for In-person and Live Online registrations.

*CEUs are based on participant’s actual class hours. Agenda is subject to change based on instructor preference and time available. Speakers and programs subject to change. Need a paper registration to mail or fax a check? Download this PDF & Fax or Mail it to us!

All Three Days

1.7 CEUs (17 hours)

$670

Thursday & Friday

1.2 CEUs (12 hours)

$455

Friday & Saturday

1.25 CEUs (12.5 hours)

$465

Thursday & Saturday

.95 CEUs (9.5 hours)

$420

Thursday Only

.45 CEUs (4.5 hours)

$205

Friday Only

.75 CEUs (7.5 hours)

$250

Saturday Only

.5 CEUs (5 hours)

$215

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F.A.Q.

Is there a Group Discount?

Three or more people (from the same place of employment) will receive 20% off of the total transaction. Registration must be completed in one payment & you must include each attendees email addresses in that registration so they can access the Event Platform & gain CEUs.  You can register & receive the group discount for attending online or in-person (or a combination). Please email sceinfo@uwm.edu for details & questions.

Can I pay by mail, phone or fax?

Courses require full payment at the time of registration. You can choose from a variety of payment methods. Payment can be made with a check, company purchase order (P.O.), money order or credit card. Checks should be made payable to “University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.” Cash is accepted through in-person registration only, please email ahead (sceinfo@uwm.edu) if this is what you plan on doing. We have limited seats, so if you plan on registering in-person with cash we must reserve your seat in advance.

If you register by mail or fax, all registrations will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis. You must rank your choices of Saturday workshops. While we will make every effort to accommodate first choices, please note that workshops have limited capacities.

Download and Print this PDF Registration Form

Mail orders to:
UWM School of Continuing Education
161 West Wisconsin Avenue, Ste. 6000
Milwaukee, WI 53203

Fax orders to:  414-227-3146

Phone:  414-227-3200

Special Needs Requests
Please advise us at the time of registration if you have special needs. Requests will be kept confidential. If requests are received less than four weeks prior to the program date, we may not be able to accommodate you.

How do I receive CEU Certificates for attending WI Hand?

In-Person Attendees will receive CEU Certificates after the last session of the day. Paper Course Evaluations must be filled out in order to receive your CEU Certificate. If you leave early then your CEUs will be adjusted accordingly.  If you are an Online attendee then joining using the Event Platform & viewing the livestream will count as checking in & filling out the digital course evaluations at the end of the day will allow us to follow up with your CEU Certificate. You will receive your CEU Certificate by email (from sce-hps@uwm.edu) within three weeks of completing your digital course evaluations.

What is your Cancelation and Refund Policy?
CANCELATION POLICY: The School of Continuing Education reserves the right to cancel or change any offering for which registrations are not sufficient to support budgeted expenses. A full refund is issued to program participants if the program is cancelled by the School of Continuing Education for any reason.

For cancellations made by a participant at least 14 days before the start of the program, a refund will be issued minus a $25.00 processing fee. For cancellations made within 14 days of the program, a certificate worth the value of the program (minus a $25.00 processing fee) will be issued and is valid for one year from the date of the original course. 

The program you are registering for is scheduled to be delivered in-person and live online. UWM has devised a decision-making strategy that considers many factors to protect the health and safety of our participants. Decisions could involve a range of actions including converting in-person programs to virtual instruction. If university decisions impact this program, you will receive communication from the School of Continuing Education. If the delivery method is changed and it no longer fits your preference and you would prefer to cancel your enrollment please contact the School of Continuing Education. 

What if I didn't receive a confirmation email?

Check the email inbox you used to register with & it’s spam folder/filter.  If you work at a large organization you may need to contact your IT department or Help Desk. Confirmation emails will come from uwm-confirmation@uwm.edu . Other important event emails will come from sce-hps@uwm.edu  & scemktg@sce.uwm.edu . If you have not received a confirmation email three days before the program, please call our office at (414) 227-3200 or email us at sceinfo@uwm.edu.

What are the COVID precautions taken for the in-person event?

Click here for details about Crowne Plaza & IHG’s “Way of Clean.”

What if I come into contact with someone who tests positive for COVID, test positive for COVID myself, or feel sick and cannot attend?
You can change your registration from in-person to fully online. Please contact our office as soon as possible at sce-hps@uwm.edu. If the delivery method of a continuing education course is changed and it no longer fits your preference and you would prefer to cancel your enrollment please contact the outreach office to change or cancel your registration.

How do I purchase a Hotel room for the event?

Lodging rooms can be reserved at a discounted rate for single and double rooms. You can book your room at the discounted rate online here.

The Special group block rate is $103 per night. Participants have until Apr 4, 2023 to book at the special rate.

Click here for details about Crowne Plaza & IHG’s “Way of Clean.”

For those attending fully online, how will we participate? What are the tech or internet requirements?
You will receive access to the same event platform that in-person attendees have access to. You will use the email address you registered with to access the platform. You can use your computer for the web browser version or the device app. You will be able to view the lectures in real time and can participate in the chat with all attendees in the platform, and view exhibitor information. Internet access (10 Mbps upload and download speed) & using Chrome Web Browser or the Webex Device App (for iOS or Android) is recommended if you are viewing LIVE online.

*Internet Explorer is NOT supported*

Why should I register early?

Early registration is encouraged to guarantee space. Priority Workshop Registration is available to those registering before March 9, 2024.  Participants are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Enrollment is confirmed upon receipt of registration and payment or agency guarantee of payment.   Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented on this website. However, all course information, instructor designations, locations and fees described in this catalog are subject to change without notice. See our website & emails for updates. Lunch is included only where indicated. If you have any questions, please call (414) 251-8950 or email sce-hps@uwm.edu.

What if I have more questions?

Contact Us: (414) 251-8950  | sce-hps@uwm.edu

Exhibitors

Wisconsin Hand Experience℠ 2024

Contact sce-hps@uwm.edu to learn more about becoming an exhibitor.

Angular Ortho
BraceLab
Kinetec
Joint Jack
orfit the personal fit
Southwest Airlines
SRT Prostheitcs & Orthotics

General Information

Every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of this information. We reserve the right to change the program without notice. Contact us at sce-hps@uwm.edu or (414) 251-8950 if you have questions. For cancellations made by a participant at least 14 days before the start of the program, a refund will be issued minus a $25.00 processing fee. For cancellations made within 14 days of the program, a certificate worth the value of the program (minus a $25.00 processing fee) will be issued and is valid for one year from the date of the original course. The program you are registering for is scheduled to be delivered in-person and live online. UWM has devised a decision-making strategy that considers many factors to protect the health and safety of our participants. Decisions could involve a range of actions including converting in-person programs to virtual instruction. If university decisions impact this program, you will receive communication from the UWM School of Continuing Education. If the delivery method is changed and it no longer fits your preference and you would prefer to cancel your enrollment please contact the the School of Continuing Education. Early registration is encouraged to guarantee space. Participants are accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis. Enrollment is confirmed upon receipt of registration and payment. Lunch and all breaks are included in course fees. 

Please advise us at the time of registration if you have special needs. Requests will be kept confidential. Please submit special needs requests four weeks prior to the program date.

Financial Disclosure:
Presenters at the Wisconsin Hand Experience Conference have signed agreements stating that they will not promote or endorse any specific products, services, or equipment during their presentations. They have also confirmed that they do not have any financial relationships with any companies or organizations that manufacture, distribute, or sell therapy-related products or services. Conference presenters do receive reimbursement for travel and an honorarium to speak at the conference. We are dedicated to ensuring transparency and maintaining the integrity of the educational content provided at our conference, if you have any questions or concerns, please email sce-hps@uwm.edu.

*CEUs are based on participant’s actual class hours. Agenda is subject to change based on instructor preference and time available. Speakers and programs subject to change.

Contact Us: (414) 251-8950 | sce-hps@uwm.edu

Education Level

Level of Instruction:
Intermediate

Target Audience:
OTs, OTAs, PTs, PTAs, ATs, and Hand Therapists

Relevance to Occupational Therapy:
Category 1: Occupational Therapy Service Delivery

person holding their wrist

American Occupational Therapy Association

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Health Professions & Sciences is an AOTA approved provider of Continuing Education. Provider #: 4001. AOTA does not endorse specific course content, products, or clinical procedures. AOTA Course Approval #.

AOTA approved provider

Approval #

APTA Standards

The Physical Therapy Examining Board (PTEB) accepts UWM CEUs. See the following websites for more information on APTA Standards:

https://aptawi.org
https://www.apta.org

Wisconsin Hand Experience℠2024

Unraveling the Mysteries of the Wrist